2022

From the Publisher | December 2022

By Barbara Godwin | December 9, 2022

Headlining this special edition is an extensive illustrated equestrian biography which documents Queen Elizabeth’s life in the saddle beginning in 1931 and ending in 2022.

I am also proud to reveal the creation and publication of the extensive Shakespeare Equestrian Collection.

In keeping with the celebration of all things royal, the renowned English equestrian historian Dr. Paula Sells wrote a fascinating article revealing the history of the royal stables. Joining the HRL team is Scottish Long Rider Louis Hall. Young, empathetic and intuitive, he writes about his Journey Across the Heart of Europe.

The entire December publication of Horse & Rider Living is unprecedented and as the publisher, I am proud to be part of this event.

Honouring Her Majesty: An Equestrian Biography of Queen Elizabeth II

By Cuchullaine O’Reilly | December 9, 2022

Few lives have been filled with so many enormous events. When Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne in 1952 Joseph Stalin ruled the Soviet Union. That mighty empire disappeared and the world changed but for 70 years there was one political and emotional stability in millions of people’s lives: Queen Elizabeth II.

The longest reigning British monarch in history, she was Commander in Chief of the Army, Head of the Church of England, attended 21,000 public engagements, gave her Royal Assent to 4,000 Acts of Parliament and raised more than £1.4 billion for worthy causes. She met five Popes and thirteen US Presidents. She greeted 15 British prime ministers from Winston Churchill to Liz Truss.

Yet politics never dimmed her passion for horses. She first mounted at the age of 3 and spent the next 93 years of her life, riding, raising and racing thousands of horses. This unique biography offers the first chronological equestrian review of this remarkable royal horse woman.

The Royal Stables, aka the Royal Mews, and the Origin of its Name

By Paula Sells | December 9, 2022

When asked to think of the famous monuments in England’s ancient capital famous names spring to mind including Buckingham Palace, Big Ben and the Tower of London. As is often the case, horse history is overlooked. That is why many people are unaware of the Royal Stables created by King Richard II in 1377.

The renowned British equestrian historian Dr. Paula Sells has composed a beautifully illustrated article which reveals the equine treasure that has served the Royal family for 645 years.

The Shakespeare Equestrian Collection

By Cuchullaine O’Reilly | December 9, 2022

It took more than five years to complete this intensive examination that documents how horses deeply influenced the personal and professional life of England’s most famous author. Her Majesty was the first to inspect this treasure trove that contains a rare pictorial biography, the first illustrated list of equine actors and an outstanding collection of articles.

Shakespeare and Horses: Facts and Findings

By Cuchullaine O’Reilly | December 9, 2022

Shakespeare and Horses: Facts and Findings is a special summary article designed to provide the average reader with an easy to understand but vitally important list of facts about how horses exerted such a strong influence on Shakespeare’s personal and professional life. It contrasts the remarkable differences between the equestrian worlds of Queen Elizabeth 1 and Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

Shakespeare and Literary Long Riders

By Cuchullaine O’Reilly | December 9, 2022

Let me ask you a question. What do these six men have in common: Jonathan Swift, Lord Byron, Charles Darwin, Oscar Wilde, William Somerset Maugham and Graham Greene?

If you answered, “They are all famous English authors” you would be partially correct. If you neglected to add that they were all enthusiastic Long Riders whose equestrian journeys influenced their lives and literature, then you will have missed a vital historical fact.

Darwin reveled in the horseback adventures he made in the jungles of Brazil, across the pampas of Argentina and through the Australian outback. If the father of natural selection has been stereotyped as a geriatric with dyspepsia, then could the Bard of Avon likewise have been misinterpreted? This portion of the Shakespeare Equestrian Collection considers that possibility.